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Our new West Olympia Medical Center opens this month

When our new Kaiser Permanente West Olympia Medical Center opens this month, it will join several other medical facilities that we’ve opened in the Puget Sound area in the last 2 years, making it easier for our members to get care. Another new medical center at Smokey Point in Marysville is scheduled to open in the spring of 2020.

Services at the new West Olympia Medical Center at 1200 Cooper Point Road SW, Suite 100, Olympia, will include primary care, mental health services, radiology, and lab and pharmacy services. Four Kaiser Permanente doctors will lead the care teams.

Primary care hours will be 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays, and until 6 p.m. on Tuesdays and Thursdays. Pharmacy hours will be 8 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. Monday to Friday.
 

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Coronavirus: Make Soap Free In Prisons

But one detail surprised me.

“As far as Counsel is aware,” the motion declares, describing the conditions at the medium-security prison where Finnestad is being held, “hand sanitizer at FCI Sheridan is simply not available as it is contraband. Soap is not provided to inmates, but rather must be purchased. Strangely, a bar of soap is no longer going to appear on commissary alone, but instead must be purchased with a more expensive hygiene packet.”

Wait a minute, I thought, prisoners have to buy their own soap?

During pandemics and normal times alike, one piece of public-health advice remains unchanged: Wash your hands often, with warm, soapy water, especially after using the bathroom or before eating. Even the Federal Bureau of Prisons declares in its 2018 guidelines on influenza epidemics, “Educate staff and inmates that the following measures help protect against the spread of influenza: Regular hand washing—especially after sneezing,

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Bill Of The Month: Pricey Genetic Test For Essential Thrombocythemia : Shots

Michelle Kuppersmith’s doctor recommended a bone marrow biopsy after suspecting she had a rare blood disorder. Though the biopsy was done by an in-network provider at an in-network hospital, Kuppersmith learned she was on the hook for $2,400 for out-of-network genetic profiling.

Shelby Knowles for KHN


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Shelby Knowles for KHN

Michelle Kuppersmith’s doctor recommended a bone marrow biopsy after suspecting she had a rare blood disorder. Though the biopsy was done by an in-network provider at an in-network hospital, Kuppersmith learned she was on the hook for $2,400 for out-of-network genetic profiling.

Shelby Knowles for KHN

Michelle Kuppersmith feels great, works full time and exercises three to four times a week. So she was surprised when a routine blood test found that her body was making too many platelets, which help control bleeding.

Kuppersmith’s doctor suspected the 32-year-old Manhattanite had a rare blood disorder called essential

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