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After 2 open-heart surgeries, a new procedure helps a Gig Harbor man avoid a third

Many of us would consider open-heart surgery a once-in-a-lifetime event, but at 50, Marv Johnson had already undergone 2 open-heart surgeries. And, in early 2019, he was facing the prospect of a third.

Johnson was born with a malformed aortic valve. Instead of 3 flaps that join together to close and keep blood from flowing in the wrong direction, Johnson had only 2. His Kaiser Permanente doctors had been keeping an eye on it since he was born.

Open-heart surgery – twice

When Johnson was 30, doctors discovered his aortic valve was failing and needed to be replaced. His only option: full open-heart surgery. He spent 2 weeks in the hospital and several months regaining his strength.

Doctors told Johnson the replacement valve would last 10 to 15 years at most. So, it wasn’t a surprise when, 8 years later, Johnson again needed open-heart surgery to replace it. This time

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The Coronavirus Makes Politics Look Small

If the worst fears are realized, the scale of the health and economic challenges posed by the coronavirus may well dwarf Brexit. Although the hardest of Brexits available, in which Britain and the EU fail to agree on a trade deal by the end of the year, is forecast to cause a recession, the mainstream view is that most other scenarios largely involve bargains of greater British autonomy in exchange for lower rates of economic growth. Take one example: On Monday, The Guardian published a story claiming that Britain leaving the Erasmus student-exchange program would “blow a hole” in its economy. What size hole, one might ask? About £243 million, or $315 million, a year—a tiny fraction of Britain’s £2.8 trillion economy. Equally, the British government estimates that the economic benefit of a trade deal with the United States—the big prize after Brexit—would amount to just

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Coronavirus Outbreaks Prompt Travel Restrictions For U.S. Military Abroad : NPR

Korean soldiers spray disinfectant as a precaution against the coronavirus on a shopping street in Seoul, South Korea, last week. U.S. military stationed in South Korea and Italy have been ordered not to travel because of the outbreak.

Ahn Young-joon/AP


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Ahn Young-joon/AP

Korean soldiers spray disinfectant as a precaution against the coronavirus on a shopping street in Seoul, South Korea, last week. U.S. military stationed in South Korea and Italy have been ordered not to travel because of the outbreak.

Ahn Young-joon/AP

A South Korean contract construction worker working at the U.S. military garrison Camp Walker in Daegu — the South Korean city hardest hit by the the coronavirus outbreak — on Monday became the eighth person linked to the U.S. military in that nation to be diagnosed with Covid-19, the disease caused by the virus.

“The problem that we found with case number 8 is

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Habits that can lead to a healthy heart

The lifestyle choices you make, including choices about what you eat and how much you exercise, can all make a difference to your heart health. When you take steps to keep your heart healthy — such as getting exercise most days of the week or drinking alcohol in moderation — you’re taking steps that will also be good for your overall health. Your health care team is ready to step in if you need help managing a condition that affects your heart.

Make heart-healthy choices

To take care of your heart, take care of the whole you. The same healthy basics that reduce your risk of other diseases also help to keep your heart strong and help it to heal if you have heart disease.

Eat right for your heart. Heart-healthy foods like fruits, vegetables, healthy proteins (such as fish, beans, chicken, nuts and low-fat dairy), and whole grains will

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