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Michael Jones Receives Royal Honors

Over the years I’ve frequently mentioned my friend Michael Jones, a computer scientist and geography whiz. Nine years ago he was a leading figure in my Atlantic story “Hacked,” the saga of what my wife Deb and I learned when her email account was taken over by international hackers. For an Atlantic column around the same time, I interviewed him on the way omnipresent, always-available mapping was likely to change people’s habits and lives. And before any of this, he had added to world knowledge with his explanation of “Boiled Frog” science. As he laid out in this guest post, careful experiments in 19th-century Germany established that a frog would indeed sit still in a pot of ever-hotter water—but only if its brain had already been removed.  

Outside our household, Michael Jones is known, among other things, as one of the guiding forces behind Google

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Coronavirus Live Updates : NPR

The second patient in a first-stage study of a potential vaccine for COVID-19 receives a shot in in March at the Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute in Seattle.

Ted S. Warren/AP


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Ted S. Warren/AP

The second patient in a first-stage study of a potential vaccine for COVID-19 receives a shot in in March at the Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute in Seattle.

Ted S. Warren/AP

Scientists are in a sprint to find a vaccine that could stamp out the coronavirus pandemic. Dr. Anthony Fauci, the nation’s top infectious diseases expert, said on Friday he’s “cautiously optimistic” that a safe and effective COVID-19 vaccine will be ready for distribution in early 2021.

But it’s unclear how many people will actually get a vaccine if it’s approved. Only about half of Americans said in May that they were willing to get a coronavirus vaccine.

That resistance

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Noir, Cop Shows, and the End of Police TV

Photographs by Devin Yalkin

Detective Elliot Stabler walks into an empty interrogation room with purpose. He’ll soon be questioning a perp who beat murder and rape charges 14 years ago, and he can’t afford a repeat, so he gives himself the edge. He cranks the thermostat up 20 degrees; he removes the screw from a chair, giving it a wobble; he swivels the light bulbs slightly out of place so the lighting flickers. With these tweaks, a confession is nigh. Yes, this is coercive, but it’s okay—he’s one of the good guys.

Before months of protests against police brutality renewed scrutiny of law enforcement, many Americans might have seen the Law & Order: SVU detective’s coercion as noble. Now the tide is turning, and taking cop shows with it. In June, Cops, the documentary ride-along show that took viewers to the front lines of the wars on

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Cold or Allergies? Symptoms: Sore Throat, Runny Nose & More

Cold and allergy symptoms often overlap, so it’s easy to mistake cold symptoms for allergies, and vice versa. Understanding the cause of your symptoms helps you choose the right treatment. It also gives you a better picture of your overall health.

Clinicians use the 5 factors below to help distinguish between colds and allergies.

1. When did you begin to feel unwell?

If you remember being around someone who had an upper respiratory infection a few days before you started feeling ill, you may have caught a viral infection. Viruses are spread by contact with sneezes, coughs, and contaminated surfaces such as door handles. Allergies, on the other hand, can begin immediately after coming in contact with triggers such as pollen. If you think you might be experiencing a seasonal allergy, check the pollen count in your area; if levels are high, allergies may be the culprit.

2. What

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