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Michelle Kuppersmith’s doctor recommended a bone marrow biopsy after suspecting she had a rare blood disorder. Though the biopsy was done by an in-network provider at an in-network hospital, Kuppersmith learned she was on the hook for $2,400 for out-of-network genetic profiling.

Shelby Knowles for KHN


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Shelby Knowles for KHN

Michelle Kuppersmith’s doctor recommended a bone marrow biopsy after suspecting she had a rare blood disorder. Though the biopsy was done by an in-network provider at an in-network hospital, Kuppersmith learned she was on the hook for $2,400 for out-of-network genetic profiling.

Shelby Knowles for KHN

Michelle Kuppersmith feels great, works full time and exercises three to four times a week. So she was surprised when a routine blood test found that her body was making too many platelets, which help control bleeding.

Kuppersmith’s doctor suspected the 32-year-old Manhattanite had a rare blood disorder called essential

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3 days ago

How to Start Your Health and Wellness Blog

Michelle Kuppersmith’s doctor recommended a bone marrow biopsy after suspecting she had a rare blood disorder. Though the biopsy was done by an in-network provider at an in-network hospital, Kuppersmith learned she was on the hook for $2,400 for out-of-network genetic profiling.

Shelby Knowles for KHN


hide caption

toggle caption

Shelby Knowles for KHN

Michelle Kuppersmith’s doctor recommended a bone marrow biopsy after suspecting she had a rare blood disorder. Though the biopsy was done by an in-network provider at an in-network hospital, Kuppersmith learned she was on the hook for $2,400 for out-of-network genetic profiling.

Shelby Knowles for KHN

Michelle Kuppersmith feels great, works full time and exercises three to four times a week. So she was surprised when a routine blood test found that her body was making too many platelets, which help control bleeding.

Kuppersmith’s doctor suspected the 32-year-old Manhattanite had a rare blood disorder called essential

Read More
3 days ago

Coronavirus: Make Soap Free In Prisons

Michelle Kuppersmith’s doctor recommended a bone marrow biopsy after suspecting she had a rare blood disorder. Though the biopsy was done by an in-network provider at an in-network hospital, Kuppersmith learned she was on the hook for $2,400 for out-of-network genetic profiling.

Shelby Knowles for KHN


hide caption

toggle caption

Shelby Knowles for KHN

Michelle Kuppersmith’s doctor recommended a bone marrow biopsy after suspecting she had a rare blood disorder. Though the biopsy was done by an in-network provider at an in-network hospital, Kuppersmith learned she was on the hook for $2,400 for out-of-network genetic profiling.

Shelby Knowles for KHN

Michelle Kuppersmith feels great, works full time and exercises three to four times a week. So she was surprised when a routine blood test found that her body was making too many platelets, which help control bleeding.

Kuppersmith’s doctor suspected the 32-year-old Manhattanite had a rare blood disorder called essential

Read More
3 days ago

Bill Of The Month: Pricey Genetic Test For Essential Thrombocythemia : Shots

Michelle Kuppersmith’s doctor recommended a bone marrow biopsy after suspecting she had a rare blood disorder. Though the biopsy was done by an in-network provider at an in-network hospital, Kuppersmith learned she was on the hook for $2,400 for out-of-network genetic profiling.

Shelby Knowles for KHN


hide caption

toggle caption

Shelby Knowles for KHN

Michelle Kuppersmith’s doctor recommended a bone marrow biopsy after suspecting she had a rare blood disorder. Though the biopsy was done by an in-network provider at an in-network hospital, Kuppersmith learned she was on the hook for $2,400 for out-of-network genetic profiling.

Shelby Knowles for KHN

Michelle Kuppersmith feels great, works full time and exercises three to four times a week. So she was surprised when a routine blood test found that her body was making too many platelets, which help control bleeding.

Kuppersmith’s doctor suspected the 32-year-old Manhattanite had a rare blood disorder called essential

Read More
3 days ago

Polio and Coronavirus: When the Victims Were Children

Although polio is only a memory in the United States, the current pandemic is stirring up feelings analogous to when this insidious crippler terrified a nation. Like the Great Influenza of 1918, polio offers historical perspective. Both the poliovirus and the coronavirus rely on “silent carriers”—those showing no immediate symptoms—to spread the disease, inciting a fearful sense of uncertainty. Both target specific, if dramatically different, age groups: COVID-19 seems especially lethal for the elderly, polio for the young.

In San Angelo, some businesses remained open, simply hoping to survive. The local cleaning establishment vowed to disinfect its equipment before each pressing and wash. The Sherwin-Williams Paint and Hardware Company promised its loyal customers toxic bug spray free of charge. (“Bring your own container,” it advised.) Agents hawked special “polio insurance,” while the town chiropractor boasted that he could prevent the disease by “keeping your

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Best At Home Workouts | Youfit Youniverse

Whether you can workout for one minute or one hour, it’s always worth it. Whether you can make it to the local gym and have all the equipment in the world or you need to get creative with an at home workout, it’s still always worth it. Home workouts are not a one size fits all approach. You have goals and you know what you want to get out of your workouts. In this blog we help you determine which type of home workout is best for you. It’s also important to recognize that the goals you have at the gym may not be the goal that is most important to you right now. Above all the most important thing is to do some type of workout to relieve stress, maintain immunity and keep your body active.

Think of your body as a door, and your joints as the hinges.

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Coronavirus Live Updates : NPR

A federal judge in California is weighing whether to grant an emergency order to release unaccompanied minors in government custody to protect them from contracting COVID-19.

U.S. District Judge Dolly Gee of the Central District of California said on Friday she wants migrant children who were apprehended crossing into the United States alone to be “released to suitable sponsors in an orderly fashion,” the Associated Press reported. But Gee stopped short of mandating their immediate release.

She also questioned why children are still being held as the number of U.S. coronavirus cases leads the global outbreak.

The motion for the temporary restraining order limiting the Trump administration’s ability to detain minors for no more than seven days was filed on Thursday, and is the latest legal battle in a long-running class action lawsuit.

Lawyers argued the week-long period provides ample time for officials to release the minors. It’s an argument

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Stressed about seeing family for the holidays? Here are 6 tips to help you cope.

Whether it’s the fear of another political argument with your uncle or feeling the absence of a loved one who passed — family holiday parties can be a stressful experience. To help you tackle some of these tough situations, Leigh Miller, LCSW, a therapist and social worker at Kaiser Permanente, shares tips on how to cope with 6 difficult — but common — family stressors during the holidays.

1. Political disagreements

In some families, political discussions can lead to major family disagreements or blowouts.

How to prepare: Make the topic off limits. Miller suggests reaching out to your family before your holiday gathering to let them know you’d prefer not to talk about politics. Instead, make it clear that you’d rather hear about what’s going on in their lives.

Day-of tactics: If politics still come up, don’t participate in the conversation. You can acknowledge that you didn’t want

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Supplements to Support Clients with Multiple Sclerosis

Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is an unpredictable and often disabling disease. No one is sure of what causes it, so there is no known cure.

We do know, however, that it is a chronic inflammatory disorder that principally affects the central nervous system by interrupting the flow of information inside of the brain and between the body and the brain. 

With MS, which usually presents in twenty-to-forty-year-old people, we see significant amounts of scar tissue and damaged myelin sheathes that leave nerves exposed. Exposed nerves are unable to effectively transmit messages within the brain or throughout the nervous system.

Consequently, MS patients report the following symptoms:

  • Poor vision, partial blindness, central vision loss
  • Cognitive impairment, like memory loss, poor judgment
  • Clumsiness, loss of balance
  • Numbness and tingling, loss of physical sensation
  • Extreme mood swings, depression
  • Digestive complications
  • Slurred speech

As the disease progresses, these conditions generally worsen, resulting in paralysis, mania,

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